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This photo is taken from Himalayan Expeditions.com

 
Steven Seagal is an environmentalist and he likes  peace, humanity, nature and animals.

     

 He is usually involved in programs on preservation of nature and wild life.

      

Also he is an  active member of PETA.

(PETA: People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals: The animal rights organization) 

Earth Day message from
Steven Seagal
 
National Wildlife Federation
 
April 22, 2005
 

 
An Earth Day Message from Steven Seagal

Be an Action Hero for the Environment!



Dear Friend of Wildlife,

Being an action hero means fighting a lot of important battles.

The fight to protect the Earth is one we can't afford to lose.

If you've seen me in On Deadly Ground or Fire Down Below you know I'm not a "Johnny-Come-Lately" to the environmental movement. I re-wrote those scripts hoping I could make the world a better place and bring people's awareness about the environment to a higher level.

If you'd like to make a difference too, I invite you to celebrate Earth Day with me on Friday, April 22nd. All you need to do is one small act* for the environment right in your hometown. It could be something as simple as turning off the lights when leaving a room...recycling old newspapers and magazines...planting a tree to clean the air...or putting up a bird house.

Whatever you choose to do to celebrate Earth Day...please add one more action item to your list...make a donation to National Wildlife Federation. My friends at NWF have been working hard to protect wildlife and wild places throughout America for nearly 70 years. But, as a non-profit organization, they can't continue their good work without caring citizens like you. So, please give generously!

With a $20 gift to NWF, you'll receive 2 limited edition "Green at Heart" wristbands. Uniquely decorated with raised images of a wolf, bear, buffalo and songbird!

For $35 you'll get 10 FREE wristbands. Share them with friends and family to get the word out about protecting the environment for our children's future.

And for $100 you'll get NWF's exclusive Guardians of the Wild Gift Package.
- 10 "Green at Heart" wristbands
- A sturdy NWF backpack, and...
- Membership in NWF's elite Guardians of the Wild society, with such benefits as a members-only newsletter, special wildlife updates and more!

Thanks for caring...and thanks for supporting National Wildlife Federation.
Sincerely,

 
Steven Seagal
 
 
Source: National Wildlife Federation

 
STEVEN SEAGAL JOINS FIGHT TO STOP THAILAND’S ELEPHANT BEATINGS
 
February 11, 2003
Bangkok - Thailand
 

 

A Letter to Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra

click here for larger image

Hollywood actor Steven Seagal has written a letter to Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra urging him to order a stop to the "systematic torture" of baby elephants, the English-language newspaper The Nation reported on Tuesday.

Seagal referred to a recent accusation by representatives of People for the Ethical Treatment of Elephants (Peta) that young elephants were allegedly routinely mistreated to make them "compliant" so they could be used as attractions in tourist entertainment facilities.

"One hundred years ago Thailand had 15 000 elephants. Today there are only 5 000, the majority of which are in private hands," the action-movie actor wrote according to the newspaper report.

He asked the prime minister in his letter to "immediately enact laws to abolish their use and abuse by the entertainment industry".

 

STAR FIGHTS CRUELTY TO STRAY DOGS

April 18, 1998

A Letter to Taiwanese Premier Vincent Siew

click here for larger image

 
Steven Seagal wants Taiwan to stop the cruel killing of stray dogs.

"I was saddened to learn that dogs outside Taipei are being rounded up and killed by drowning, electrocution and poisoning," Seagal wrote in a letter to Taiwanese Premier Vincent Siew, asking for passage of an animal protection bill pending in the legislature.

Seagal, who said he considers Taiwan his "spiritual homeland", wrote the letter after viewing photographs taken during a People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals investigation.

The British-based World Society for the Protection of Animals claims Taiwan is the "world leader" in cruelty to strays. -- Sapa-AP

 
INTERVIEW WITH STEVEN SEAGAL - I -
 

A Buddhist lama, master of martial arts, actor, director: In 1998, Steven Seagal’s reverence for life prompted him to join PETA’s efforts to help dogs doomed to die in Taiwan’s “drowning tanks.” Mr. Seagal traveled to Taiwan and saw some of the dogs firsthand. He also met with Taiwan’s premier to plead for improvements. Soon after, the legislature passed the first-ever anti-cruelty law in Taiwan.

In March of 1999, Mr Seagal wrote to the prime minister of Japan asking that he prohibit the Fuji Safari Park from importing baby elephants from South Africa and wrote to all members of India’s Parliament in August asking them to amend the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act to stop the torture of animals who are killed in India’s leather trade. He received a PETA Humanitarian Award in 1999.

Recently, Mr. Seagal spoke to PETA’s Dan Mathews at home with pound cats Sylvester and Gap and dogs Gruff, Cole and Chaos.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Did you grow up around animals?
Even though I was born in a city, we were close to the woods in Michigan and I got to be around animals a lot. Lots of people hunted and fished. From an early age, that was something that I didn’t feel good about.

In my early years, I went to Asia to study Buddhism, acupuncture, herbology and the martial arts. It became apparent to me that all sentient beings, from the smallest insect to the mightiest human, are equally precious. In my home, we don’t allow anyone to kill spiders or flies because we believe that all life is precious. I have lots of animals: horses, sheep, cows, cats, dogs and llamas. We all get along, and we all respect each other.

There was something you said in your speech when you received a PETA Humanitarian Award about shaming companies into changing.
Businesses can keep doing what they’re doing because our judicial system will not fine them enough for it to matter to them. So, the only way that we can deter these people is by embarrassing them.

How do you feel about PETA’s tactics?
It’s like being married. You’ll never agree all the time. I don’t agree with everything PETA has done, but the reason why I’m deeply involved in PETA is because we’re saving lives and we’re helping those who are suffering.

How do you feel about fur?
I think it’s deplorable. It’s not like the Native Americans, who did this to stay alive. The people who farm animals to murder them for furs are atrocious and horrible.

In your travels, have you had any special interactions with animals?
I was in Japan and I had my own dojo, or school, there. I was having some difficulties with a group of lawless individuals—there was this big conflict.

I remember I was sitting out in front of my dojo and I saw this white dog who just walked right up to me as if he had known me forever. I petted him and fed him. He stayed with me for a few days.

On about the third day, he woke me up with really intense barking at about four in the morning. I noticed that my dojo was on fire. I quickly summoned help, and we got the fire out, and I thanked the dog. The next day, he disappeared.

What would you say to people who say animals are here for us to use?
I had a foreman once who said that, and he didn’t last long. He was supposed to be looking after my animals. I just don’t feel that way. I think we’re here to take care of each other.

The more people commune with animals and relate to animals, the better off we’ll all be. There are stories about people who have gone into comas or have had strokes being brought back to health through communion with animals. What does that tell you?

If relationships with animals can heal us, doesn’t that tell you that they’re quite special?

Indian Cow Steven Seagal wrote to India's MP's to ask for more legal protection for cows

Source: http://www.peta.org.uk 

 
INTERVIEW WITH STEVEN SEAGAL - II -
 

Action star Steven Seagal, whose recent #1 movie, Exit Wounds, was just released on dvd and home video, invited PETA into the sprawling southern California home he shares with his wife, their daughter and a slew of adopted cats and dogs to share his sentiments about animal rights. Seagal, a longtime animal advocate, received a Humanitarian Award for helping PETA establish the first animal protection laws in Taiwan.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

When did you first realize that you cared about animals?
From the time that I could think, and deliberate, and understand. Even though I was born in a city, we were also close to the woods in Michigan, and the lakes, and got to be around animals a lot. Of course, being raised in an American city as a child, back then people all believed in hunting and fishing. And back from an early age, that was something that I always felt not good about.

Early on, I went into Asia to study Buddhism, acupuncture, herbology, and the martial arts. This was in the late ’60s, early ’70s, that for the first time, I learnt the deeper meaning of Buddhism. It became apparent to me that the lives of all sentient beings, from the smallest insect to the mightiest human, are equally precious. I started to learn a little bit about equanimity. Now anyone around me here knows, we don’t allow someone to kill a spider. We don’t allow someone to kill a fly. All life is equally precious.

What do you think about PETA’s approach?
Listen, it’s like being married. You never agree with everything everybody does that you’re close to. I’m deeply involved in PETA because the truth is, we’re saving the lives of sentient beings, and we’re helping those that are suffering, animals who are being treated cruelly, murdered, tortured.

In your speech for PETA’s humanitarian award, you talked about embarrassing some of the companies into changing—that really struck a lot of people.

Well, our judicial system is almost useless. It's highly flawed. And it only makes for better business for [companies] to keep doing what they’re doing because our judicial system will not stop them or fine them enough for it to matter to them. So, the only way that we can stop or deter these people from doing what they’re doing is by embarrassing them. And quite frankly, when you have a situation where there is an entity that’s making money, it's hard to stop them. The more money they make, the more visible they are, and the more visible they are, the more vulnerable they are to exposure in the press.

What would you say to people who say that animals are here for us to use?
I had a foreman once who said that to me, and he didn’t last very long. He was supposed to be looking after my horses and all of my animals. I don’t feel that way. I think we’re here to take care of each other. It’s a very superficial thought that we are superior. Some animals are smarter than some humans, let me tell you. Any kind of cruelty to animals is heart-wrenching.

The more people commune with animals and relate to animals as equals, the better off we’ll all be. And one of the good examples of that is people who have gone into comas, people who have had strokes, people that are having various and sundry different maladies [so] that they have lost their faculties and capabilities—they’re using communion with animals to bring them back to health. Well, what does that tell you?

The birdman of Alcatraz is a true story. I’d like to remake that movie.

In your travels, have there been any stories or interactions with animals or with people about animals?
Yes, I was in Osaka, Japan. I was having some difficulties with a group of sort of lawless individuals. I had my own dojo, or school, there. There was a big conflict, and it was sort of escalating, and, you know, life wasn’t really easy for me during this time. I was sitting out in front of my dojo and I saw this kind of really mysterious, unusual-looking white dog that just walked right up to me as if he had known me forever. I petted him, and he wouldn’t go away, so I fed him. He stayed with me for a few days—he just sort of adopted me. We have what’s called a ginkon, which is this sort of porch inside the area there, and he slept in there, and I fed him. And about the third day or fourth day [that] he was there, he woke me up with really intense barking at about four in the morning. I was way in the back, but when he woke me, I saw that my dojo was on fire. I quickly managed to summon help, and we got the fire out, and I thanked the dog. And the next day he disappeared.

Source: http://www.peta.org.uk 


This photo is taken from Himalayan Expeditions.com

Background Music-Coban Yildizi (means:morning star - venus)
Composed & Conducted by: Melih Kibar
Album:Yadigar

 
 
 
 
 
Suzi   2005